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Alveoplasty is the process of surgically re-contouring and modifying the jawbone ridge, usually after tooth extraction, to enhance the healing process and prepare the jawbone for subsequent dental restoration procedures such as the placement of dentures.

In some cases, tooth extraction leaves the jawbone surface uneven with high and low points in the socket where the tooth used to be. This poses a problem as the denture is likely to rub against the high points of the socket, making it unstable. Alveoplasty is performed in such cases to smooth out the jawbone to achieve correct alignment, which will make it easier for the dentist to fit dentures as well as help patients by enhancing retention of the said dental prosthesis.

Who Should Undergo and Expected Results

Alveoplasty can be recommended for patients following their tooth extraction to smooth out any rough bone ridges and remove any irregularities in the jawbone. This prepares the jawbone for the placement of dental prostheses such as dentures. The procedure can also be performed alone, without any preceding tooth extraction, for people who no longer have their complete set of natural teeth for a long time and have experienced weakness in their jawbone following bone loss. Some may even exhibit a ridge or lip of bone that protrudes.

This surgical procedure entails several days of rest, especially if performed with tooth extraction. The patient is placed on a soft diet for days to ensure the surgical wound remains undamaged and unopened.

The procedure has a high satisfaction rate, with most patients able to have their dentures fully aligned and attached. A better fit for dental prosthetics results in improved quality of life, especially in dental function, and ensures maximum retention.

How is the Procedure Performed?

Depending on the need, the patient may be placed under local or general anaesthesia for the procedure. The oral surgeon then makes an incision along the gum line, near the area where trimming is required, and the tissue flap is raised to expose the jawbone. The surgeon then proceeds to remove or drill out unnecessary bone using specialised surgical tools like a rotary drill or chisel.

At this point, there are several techniques that can be employed to remove any extra bone. A simple alveoplasty can be used for the removal of both the buccal alveolar plate and interseptal bone through simple bone trimming.

For patients who have a single tooth extracted, the excess bony tissue on both sides of the socket will be removed. The surgeon will then proceed to remove and file excess bones before ending the procedure.

There are other modifications to these techniques that the surgeon can also perform. These include the radical alveoplasty, which involves the complete removal of the labial plate while another technique requires the removal of the interradicular bone.

After modifying and smoothing out the jawbone, bone particles are removed by washing the surgical area with a saline solution. After making sure that no debris is left behind, the flap is lowered and the incision closed with surgical sutures.


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A wisdom tooth is often extracted to correct an actual problem or to prevent a problem that may come up in the future. When wisdom teeth are starting to erupt, a number of problems can occur: your jaw may not be large enough to accommodate them and they may become impacted and unable to break through your gums. Your wisdom teeth may also break partway through your gums, causing a flap of gum tissue to grow over them. Food and germs can become trapped under the flap and cause your gums to become red, swollen, and painful – these are the signs of an infection. More serious problems can develop from impacted teeth, such as damage to other teeth and bone, or the development of a cyst.

Procedure

An extraction begins with local anaesthetic being placed to numb the tooth and the surrounding area. Once the tooth is completely anaesthetized, the doctor will “wiggle” the tooth in the socket to break the fibrous bonds that hold the tooth to the bone. When the tooth is sufficiently loose, the doctor will use a tool that elevates the tooth out of alignment. Sometimes that will cause the tooth to come out immediately. Often, the doctor will then use the forceps to “grab” the tooth and wiggle it out the rest of the way. Occasionally, if a tooth is more attached to the bone or the roots are misaligned to not allow easy extraction, the doctor will use a drill to cut the tooth into sections. This allows for easier access and less traumatic removal of the tooth.

Extractions are very much about technique and leverage. Our doctors are all taught the latest techniques and have all the equipment needed to look after most extractions. Specific, complicated extractions are often referred to one of the great oral surgeons in the area, if needed. Talk to your dentist about your specific case and the best options for you.


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The main function of a bone graft is that, over a period of time, the jawbone associated with missing teeth atrophies or is reabsorbed. This often leaves a condition in which there is poor quality and quantity of bone suitable for the placement of dental implants or for properly fitting dentures.

A bone graft is a procedure that replaces missing bone with material from the patient’s own body or an artificial, synthetic, or natural substitute. The graft not only replaces missing bone, but it can also preserve, and in some cases, reverse bone loss. Over time, this new growth then strengthens the area by forming a bridge between your existing bone and the grafted material.

Bone grafts and implants give patients the opportunity to replace missing teeth, to gain back their confidence and restore esthetic appearance and functionality.


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