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Over time, our teeth begin to weaken and become more susceptible to problems such as decay, cracks, discoloration and wear. If you feel that your smile isn’t what it once was, crowns can help you recover your smile. If your dentist notices that a tooth is decayed or seems weakened/cracked, a crown may be necessary to make sure that there are no additional problems with the tooth. In cases like this, a filling or bonding will not be sufficient. Crowns can be made from porcelain, porcelain fused to metal, zirconia, or a full gold crown. A consultation with the dentist is the first step to determine what would be the best option for your particular needs.

The process of a crown takes two visits to the dentist. On the first visit, the tooth will be reshaped by filing down the enamel so that the crown can be placed over it. You will be given a local anesthetic so that you do not experience any discomfort. Sometimes, if the tooth was broken or the inside of the tooth was compromised, a new filing will be put in to ensure a solid foundation for the crown to sit on. This is called a build up. Once the tooth has been reshaped, an impression will be taken of that tooth and surrounding teeth. This impression will be sent to a dental lab so that your new custom crown can be made. Before leaving the dental office, we will fit you with a temporary crown until your permanent crown is ready.

The crown takes one week to be returned to your dentist. At this time, you will have another appointment to place and fit the permanent crown. You will again have the local anesthetic to numb the area, and the crown will be placed using a cement to ensure that it sets in place. When you look in the mirror, you will see your old smile back. Crowns are durable and will usually last about 10-15 years. You should care for it as you would for your other teeth with regular brushing and flossing.


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A dental bridge is a restoration that replaces one or more missing teeth. It extends across an area that has no teeth and is typically made up of an artificial tooth fused between two crowns. Bridges are made from gold, metal alloys, porcelain or a combination to ensure that they are strong and durable. The process of creating a bridge begins by creating abutments out of your existing teeth where the bridge will be attached. This process is identical to how crowns are prepared (see crowns). The dentist will often remove and replace any old restorations in these teeth to ensure that there will be no decay present underneath the bridge. These are called build-ups. After the abutments have been created, a mold is taken of the area which is sent to a dental lab. The lab is able to use the mold to create a custom bridge that will fit properly and will feel like your natural teeth. The bridge consists of two crowns on either end to place the abutments, and a pontic – a solid tooth shaped piece – that is the new tooth replacing your missing one.

We will then fit you with a temporary bridge while we wait for the lab to craft your permanent bridge. This will protect the abutment and exposed gum area and look more appealing than having a missing tooth. When the permanent bridge has been created, we will have a follow-up visit to seat the bridge. It will be placed on the abutments, and the dentist will then use an adhesive for the final placement of the bridge.

The bridge may take a while to get used to, but after a few days, it should feel like your own teeth. You should eat soft foods for the first few days. After a short while, you will be able to eat whatever you want with no issues. If you are missing a tooth, you should strongly consider having it replaced, because missing teeth can cause structural changes to your mouth and jaw, as well as making it difficult to eat or speak properly. Set up an appointment today to restore your smile.


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Your teeth are held in place by roots that extend into your jawbone. Front teeth usually have one root. Other teeth, such as your premolars and molars, have two or more roots. The tip of each root is called the apex. Nerves and blood vessels enter the tooth through the apex, travel through a canal inside the root, and into the pulp chamber, which is inside the crown (the part of the tooth visible in the mouth).

An apicoectomy may be needed when an infection develops or persists after root canal treatment or retreatment. During root canal treatment, the canals are cleaned, and inflamed or infected tissue is removed. Root canals are very complex, with many small branches off the main canal. Sometimes, even after root canal treatment, infected debris can remain in these branches and possibly prevent healing or cause re-infection later. In an apicoectomy, the root tip, or apex, is removed along with the infected tissue. A filling is then placed to seal the end of the root.

An apicoectomy is sometimes called endodontic microsurgery because the procedure is done under an operating microscope.

What It’s Used For

If a root canal becomes infected again after a root canal has been done, it’s often because of a problem near the apex of the root. Your dentist can do an apicoectomy to fix the problem so the tooth doesn’t need to be extracted. An apicoectomy is done only after a tooth has had at least one root canal procedure.

In many cases, a second root canal treatment is considered before an apicoectomy. With advances in technology, dentists often can detect additional canals that were not adequately treated and can clear up the infection by doing a second root canal procedure, thus avoiding the need for an apicoectomy.

An apicoectomy is not the same as a root resection. In a root resection, an entire root is removed, rather than just the tip.

Preparation

Before the procedure, you will have a consultation with your dentist. Your general dentist can do the apicoectomy, but, with the advances in endodontic microsurgery, it is best to be referred to an endodontist.

Your dentist may take X-rays and you may be given an antimicrobial mouth rinse, anti-inflammatory medication and/or antibiotics before the surgery.

If you have high blood pressure or know that you have problems with the epinephrine in local anesthetics, let your dentist know at the consultation. The local anesthetic used for an apicoectomy has about twice as much epinephrine (similar to adrenaline) as the anesthetics used when you get a filling. The extra epinephrine constricts your blood vessels to reduce bleeding near the surgical site so the endodontist can see the root. You may feel your heart rate speed up after you receive the local anesthetic, but this will subside after a few minutes.

How It’s Done

The endodontist will cut and lift the gum away from the tooth so the root is easily accessible. The infected tissue will be removed along with the last few millimeters of the root tip. He or she will use a dye that highlights cracks and fractures in the tooth. If the tooth is cracked or fractured, it may have to be extracted, and the apicoectomy will not continue.

To complete the apicoectomy, 3 to 4 millimeters of the tooth’s canal are cleaned and sealed. The cleaning usually is done under a microscope using ultrasonic instruments. Use of a surgical microscope increases the chances for success because the light and magnification allow the endodontist to see the area better. Your endodontist then will take an X-ray of the area before suturing the tissue back in place.

Most apicoectomies take between 30 to 90 minutes, depending on the location of the tooth and the complexity of the root structure. Procedures on front teeth are generally the shortest. Those on lower molars generally take the longest.

Follow-Up

You will receive instructions from your endodontist about which medications to take and what you can eat or drink. You should ice the area for 10 to 12 hours after the surgery, and rest during that time.

The area may bruise and swell. It may be more swollen the second day after the procedure than the first day. Any pain usually can be controlled with over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofem (Advil, Motrin and others) or prescription medication.

To allow for healing, you should avoid brushing the area, rinsing vigorously, smoking or eating crunchy or hard foods. Do not lift your lip to examine the area, because this can disrupt blood-clot formation and loosen the sutures.

You may have some numbness in the area for days or weeks from the trauma of the surgery. This does not mean that nerves have been damaged. Tell your dentist about any numbness you experience.

Your stitches will be removed 2 to 7 days after the procedure, and all soreness and swelling are usually gone by 14 days after the procedure.

Even though an apicoectomy is considered surgery, many people say that recovering from an apicoectomy is easier than recovering from the original root-canal treatment.

Do you need more information on Apicoectomy (Endodontic Surgery)? Don’t hestitate to call Reedley Family Dental at (559) 637-0123.


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When the nerve of a tooth is affected by decay or an infection, a root canal procedure is necessary. In order to ensure tooth survival, the living tissue inside the tooth known as the pulp will have to be removed along with the nerves, bacteria, and overall decay. The empty space is then filled with medicated dental materials, specially designed to restore the tooth to full functionality.

Having a root canal performed is the best treatment for saving an infected tooth that would otherwise wither away and die on its own. Many patients believe that removing a tooth is the only way to fix a problem. Not only is this untrue, but removing a tooth can end up being more expensive than other procedures because the infection might spread to adjacent teeth. Root canals are very successful and in most cases, last a lifetime. If there are any new infections that form, the tooth can easily retreat.


Symptoms that might require a Root Canal:

  1. Swelling or tenderness
  2. Heat and cold sensitivity
  3. Severe toothache (worse with pressure)
  4. Presence of an abscess (round bump) on the gums

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Inlays and Onlays are custom fillings, fabricated in a lab. They use the existing tooth as a base and fit the Inlay or Onlays onto the tooth in an area that has been prepared by the dentist. This is done to strengthen the tooth, restore its shape, and prevent future damage. An Inlay is done when there is no damage to the cusps of the tooth and the restoration can be placed right in the prepared area. An Onlay is used when the damage is a little more extensive, such as decay or a break in the tooth that involves one cusp or more. The decayed area of the tooth is first removed during the procedure. If the tooth is broken, the area is smoothed and shaped to better accept the Onlay. An impression of the tooth is then taken and sent to the lab. The restoration takes about 1-2 weeks to make, so a temporary Inlay or Onlay will be placed on the tooth during that time.

During the next visit, the Inlay or Onlay will be placed into the mouth and set with a cement. An Onlay is a conservative option for restoring a tooth where a crown might otherwise be required. Ask our team if this is a good option for you.


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Composite fillings are also called “white” fillings. Getting this type of filling used to depend on where the tooth is in your mouth. We bite down hard on our back teeth, so a white filling was not a good choice in the past. The technology associated with the new composite fillings, in recent years, has made this type of material, both acceptable and even preferable for both large and small restorations. To place this filling, your dentist cleans all decay from the tooth, and puts a glue (or bonding material) on the inside of the prepared area. Composite resin is then put into the preparation in thin layers. Each layer is then set with the help of a special blue light that your dentist holds over the tooth. When the last layer of the filling is hard, the dentist shapes the filling so it looks and feels natural.

Contact our office at (559) 637-0123 to find out how you can help prevent tooth decay or visit our preventative care page.


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Teeth whitening is an established procedure in cosmetic dentistry. Carbamide Peroxide and Hydrogen Peroxide are the active whitening ingredients and have been used safely for many years in the treatment of gums and other oral soft tissues.

Over time, our teeth tend to become discolored or stained. Whether this is from smoking, coffee, tea, trauma, or any other foods, a beautiful smile could be closer than you think. We offer Take-Home Whitening kits (Day White) that can get your teeth many shades whiter.

Please contact us today to see if you are a candidate for this type of whitening.


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A porcelain veneer is an ultra-thin layer of ceramic material, which is placed over a tooth surface to create a new smile. This procedure requires a little anesthesia, and can be an ideal choice for teeth that appear too small or large, slightly discolored, or simply not cosmetically pleasing to the patient. For many patients, teeth may have been chipped, became discolored, or slightly cracked. For the majority of these patients, porcelain veneers can prove to be a perfect solution.

When placing porcelain veneers, we pay close attention to the patient’s surrounding teeth and the design of each veneer to complement the overall smile. Generally, only 0.3-0.7mm needs to be removed from the surface of your tooth. The veneer is then made and bonded to the tooth. The result is a beautiful and attractive new smile.

Procedure

The procedure begins with the preparation of the tooth. This entails removing the discolored or unsightly portion of the tooth and meticulously shaping the tooth in preparation for the new veneer. Once we have shaped the tooth, we will take an impression. The impression will be sent to a dental lab, where your new restoration will be made. Meanwhile, a temporary veneer is made out of plastic and place on the tooth. They are used to protect your tooth while the real veneer is being fabricated. At the second appointment, the temporary veneer will be removed and the porcelain veneer is bonded to your tooth. Although they are thin, porcelain veneers are much stronger than composite “bonding” veneers, so the risk of fracture compared to composite veneers is much less.

We’re smile experts. Let us know how can we help you. Call Reedley Family Dental for details.


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Whether your teeth are discolored or chipped, or moderately crooked, Lumineers is likely a perfect solution for you.

Brighten Stained and Discolored Teeth…Permanently

Staining and discoloration are common problems. Teeth whitening is a common option, but may not eliminate all the stains, or last very long. Lumineers provide a long-lasting white smile, no matter what you eat or drink! Whether the stains are caused by time, drinking coffee or red wine, or by tetracycline staining, Lumineers can transform your smile with a permanently bright and natural look.

Restore Chipped Teeth

Do you have a chip on one of your teeth? Is it right in the front where everyone can see? Lumineers offer a painless and pleasant way to fix your chipped tooth for good.

Eliminate Spacing and Gaps

Is there a gap between your front teeth or some other spacing problem that you wish you didn’t have? Lumineers is a fast, non-invasive procedure for eliminating gaps between teeth. In just 2 short visits to your dentist, these ultra-thin “smile shapers” will eliminate excess space, while keeping your original teeth intact.

Align Crooked Teeth

Lumineers provide a painless, fast alternative to braces that offers a perfectly-aligned look along with a beautiful smile. Despite the fact that braces are readily available for adults, most do not want to endure the pain and suffering, or the embarrassment. Now you can have a completely corrected smile, in just 2 short visits to your dentist, with Lumineers—an ideal alternative to orthodontics.

Reshape Small or Misshapen Teeth

Misshapen teeth can really detract from your appearance. You’ve probably been reluctant to have a traditional veneer procedure for fear that your teeth will be ground down. Not with Lumineers. Ultra-thin Lumineers are simply placed over your original teeth, and in most cases don’t require the removal of any sensitive tooth structure.

Renew Old Dental Work

No matter your age, old crowns and bridgework add many years to your face. Lumineers can easily be placed on top of crowns and bridgework to give you a beautiful smile—painlessly.

Perfect Your Hollywood Smile

Your smile may look pretty good, but you want it to look great. A Certified Lumineers Dentist will evaluate your smile and help you achieve the look you want in just 2 short, painless visits.

Give Reedley Family Dental a call today to see if Lumineers will work for your smile!


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Implant retained dentures are more secure than traditional dentures. Removable dentures must be held in place by a bonding agent, and are traditionally known for coming loose when you eat certain foods. Implants are held in place more securely and are overall more reliable.

  • Implant dentures are also more comfortable for the wearer. Most people report they don’t even feel like they have dentures in.
  • Implant retained dentures also prevent the wearer from experiencing sore spots and pressure points commonly associated with removable dentures.
  • When wearing implanted dentures, it prevents further bone loss that occurs from missing teeth. This also allows the facial structure to stay the same, and keeps your mouth healthier.

Are you interested in Implant Retained Dentures? Call Reedley Family Dental at (559) 637-0123 for details.


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